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Ichiro Suzuki

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Full Name: Ichiro Suzuki Primary Position: OF,CF,RF
Height/Weight: 5'11"/170 First Game: April 2, 2001
Birthdate: October 22, 1973 MLB Experience: 7 years
Birthplace: Kasugai, Japan
Bat/Throw: Left/Right


Biography

Ichiro Suzuki (Ichiro Suzuki) was born on October 22, 1973 in Kasugai, Japan. He made his Major League debut on April 2, 2001 for the Seattle Mariners. In 2001, his rookie year, he hit .350 with 8 home runs and 69 RBI. Suzuki played for the Seattle Mariners for his entire 6 year career.

There is some disagreement over which season was Ichiro Suzuki's best. Some believe it was 2001, when he stole 56 bases, hit for a .350 average and knocked in 69 runs. Others believe it was 2004, as he set several MLB records, including a new all-time, single-season Major League record with 262 hits.

Ichiro is considered one of the best defensive outfielders, if not one of the best defensive players in the entire league.

Childhood preparation

At age seven, Ichiro joined his first baseball team and asked his father, Nobuyuki Suzuki (鈴木宣之 Suzuki Nobuyuki), to teach him to be a better player. The two began a daily routine which included:

  • throwing 50 pitches
  • hitting 200 pitches from Nobuyuki
  • fielding 50 infield balls and 50 outfield balls, and
  • hitting 250-300 pitches from a machine.

As a Little Leaguer, Ichiro had the word shūchū (集中 — "concentration") written on his glove. By age 12, he had set professional baseball as his goal and, while he apparently shared his father's vision, he did not enjoy their training sessions. Nobuyuki claimed, "Baseball was fun for both of us," but Ichiro later said, "It might have been fun for him, but for me it was a lot like "Star of the Giants," a popular Japanese manga series that told of a young boy's difficult road to success as a professional baseball player, with rigorous training demanded by the father. According to Ichiro, "It bordered on hazing and I suffered a lot."

When Ichiro joined his high school baseball team, his father told the coach, "No matter how good Ichiro is, don't ever praise him. We have to make him spiritually strong." When he was ready to enter high school, Ichiro was selected by a school with a prestigious baseball program, Nagoya's Aikodai Meiden Kōkō, where, unlike as a professional, Ichiro was primarily a pitcher instead of an outfielder, owing to his exceptionally strong arm. Among the strength drills he performed in training there were hurling car tires and hitting wiffleballs with a heavy shovel. These exercises helped develop his wrists and hips, adding power and endurance to his thin frame. Yet, despite the production of outstanding numbers in high school, Ichiro was not drafted until the fourth and final round of the professional draft in November 1991 because many teams were put off by his small size, 5'9", 120 pounds (54 kg). (Whiting, 2004, pp. 2–12)

Career in Japan

Ichiro made his Pacific League debut in 1992 at the age of 18, but he spent most of his first two seasons with a farm team due to his manager's refusal to accept Ichiro's unorthodox swing. The swing, nicknamed 'pendulum' due to the pendulum-like motion of his leg, shifting the weight forward as he swung the bat, was considered to go against conventional baseball wisdom, which insisted that the weight must remain on the rear leg in order to hit the ball effectively. Thus, even though he hit a homerun off Hideo Nomo, who later won the rookie of the year in MLB as a Dodger, in the second season, he was sent back to the farm on that very day. In 1994 he benefited from the arrival of a new manager who put him in the second spot of the lineup, which eventually changed to the leadoff spot, for the Blue Wave and allowed him to hit any way he wanted. He responded by setting a Japanese single-season record with 210 hits in 130 games for a then-Pacific League record .385 batting average and won the first of a record seven consecutive batting titles. He also hit 13 home runs and had 29 stolen bases, helping him to earn his first of three straight Pacific League MVP (Most Valuable Player) awards.

It was during the 1994 season that he began to use "Ichiro" instead of "Suzuki" on his uniform. Suzuki is the second most common surname in Japan, and his manager introduced the idea as a publicity stunt to help create a new image for what had been a relatively weak team, as well as a way to distinguish their rising star. Initially, Ichiro disliked and was embarrassed by the practice, but by the end of the season "Ichiro" was a household word and he was being flooded with endorsement offers.

In 1995 Ichiro led the Blue Wave to their first Pacific League pennant in 12 years. In addition to his second batting title, he led the league with 80 RBI (runs batted in), hit 25 home runs, and stole 49 bases. By this time, the Japanese press had begun calling him the "Human Batting Machine." The following year, with Ichiro winning his third straight MVP award, the team defeated the Central League champion, Yomiuri Giants, in the Japan Series. Following the 1996 season, playing in an exhibition series against a visiting team of Major League All-Stars kindled Ichiro's desire to travel to the United States to play in the Major Leagues.

In 2000, Ichiro was still a year away from being eligible for free agency, but the Blue Wave were no longer among Japan's best teams and would probably not be able to afford to keep him. In a move both charitable and practical, Manager Akira Ogi decided to release Ichiro from any obligations to the team and allow him to pursue his dream. After the 2000 season, in which Ichiro posted his highest batting average- .387, a Pacific League record, former U.S.-born Hanshin Tigers player, Randy Bass, holds the highest single-season batting average in Japanese baseball history with .389 in 1986. Seattle won a bidding war among Major League teams for the rights to negotiate with him on a contract. Ichiro signed a three-year, $14 million contract with the Mariners and became the first Japanese-born everyday position player in the Major Leagues.

In his nine seasons in Japan, Ichiro was a career .353 batter and, in addition to his hitting achievements, won seven Gold Glove Awards.

In January 2006, Ichiro played himself in a Japanese Columbo-like drama, Furuhata Ninzaburo. In the drama, he kills a person and is arrested.

Career in Major League Baseball

On November 9, 2000, Ichiro was drafted by the Seattle Mariners a contract worth roughly $14 million. Ichiro's move to the United States was viewed with great interest because he was the first Japanese position player to play regularly for a Major League Baseball team. Up to that point, only pitchers from Japan had been playing in the United States and, in the same way that many Japanese teams had considered the 18-year-old Ichiro too small to draft in 1992, many in the US believed he was too frail to succeed against Major League pitching or endure the longer 162-game season.

Not only did he prove he belonged, Ichiro had a remarkable 2001 season, accumulating 242 hits (the most by any player since 1930 as well as a rookie record) and leading the league with a .350 batting average and 56 stolen bases. By mid-season, he had produced hitting streaks of 15 and 23 games, been on the cover of Sports Illustrated, and created a media storm on both sides of the Pacific. In Seattle, ticket sales (and wins) were higher than ever, fans from Japan were taking $2,000 baseball tours to see the games, more than 150 Japanese reporters and photographers were clamoring for access, and "Ichirolls" were being sold at sushi stands in the ballpark. The flight agencies also benefited from Ichiro, many Ichiro fans were flying in and out of the country just to see him play. (Whiting, 2004, pp. 25–31)

Aided by Major League Baseball's decision to allow All-Star voting in Japan, Ichiro was the first rookie to lead all players in voting for the All-Star Game. At season's end, he won the American League Most Valuable Player and the Rookie of the Year awards, becoming only the second player in MLB history (after Fred Lynn) to receive both honors in the same season. Some sportswriters criticized his official "rookie" status, saying that his years of experience in the Japanese "major leagues" gave him an unfair advantage over other rookie players who had little or no prior major league experience.

Ichiro is also a five-time Gold Glove winner from 2001 through 2005. His success has opened the door for other Japanese players like Yomiuri Giants slugger Hideki Matsui to enter the Major Leagues.

Ichiro is noted for his work ethic in arriving early for his team's games, and for his calisthetic stretching exercises to stay limber even during the middle of the game. Continuing the custom he began in Japan, he uses his given name on the back of his uniform instead of his surname, becoming the first player in Major League Baseball to do so since Vida Blue.

Ichiro's career is followed closely in Japan, with national television news programs covering each of his at-bats, and with special tour packages arranged for Japanese fans to visit the United States to view his games.

Ichiro resides in nearby Bellevue, a suburb across Lake Washington from Seattle.

Record-setting 2004 season

Ichiro set a number of Major League records during the 2004 season:

  • August 26: With a home run off of Kansas City Royals reliever Jeremy Affeldt, Ichiro became the first player in Major League history to reach 200 hits in each of his first four seasons.
  • August 28: He became the first player in MLB history to have three 50-hit months in a single season.
  • September 17: He broke the major league record with his 199th single of the season in the seventh. Ichiro bettered the modern (post-1900) record of 198 set by Lloyd Waner of Pittsburgh in 1927.
  • September 22: Broke Harry Heilmann's 1925 record with his 135th hit on the road. It is also arguably Ichiro's hottest streak of the season as he collects nine hits over two games, 11 hits over three games (both personal season highs) and 13 hits over a four-game span (tying his personal season high).
  • October 1: Ichiro collected his 258th and 259th hits, breaking the record set by George Sisler with the St. Louis Browns in 1920. His 257th hit also set the Major League record for most hits over any four-year span, with 919.
  • October 3: Ichiro completed the 2004 season with 262 hits and an MLB-leading .372 batting average. His 225 Singles in 2004 shattered the previous all-era record of 206, set by Wee Willie Keeler in 1898. He also finished with 145 hits on the road breaking Heilmann's 79-year-old record of 134. Ichiro's 704 at bats fell one short of Willie Wilson's record of 705.

2005 Season

  • September 30: In 2005, Ichiro collected over 200 hits for the 5th straight season after going 4/5 against the Oakland A's. He became the first player ever to collect 200 hits per season over his first five years in the league and just the sixth to do so five consecutive times at any point in his career joining Willie Keeler, Wade Boggs, Chuck Klein, Al Simmons, and Charlie Gehringer.

Scouting Report

Statistics

Batting Stats

Year Team G AB R H HR RBI AVG OBP SLG 2B 3B BB SO HBP SH SB IBB GDP
2001 SEA A 157 692 127 242 8 69 .350 .381 .457 34 8 30 53 8 4 56 10 3
2002 SEA A 157 647 111 208 8 51 .321 .388 .425 27 8 68 62 5 3 31 27 8
2003 SEA A 159 679 111 212 13 62 .312 .352 .436 29 8 36 69 6 3 34 7 3
2004 SEA A 161 704 101 262 8 60 .372 .414 .455 24 5 49 63 4 2 36 19 6
2005 SEA A 162 679 111 206 15 68 .303 .350 .436 21 12 48 66 4 2 33 23 5
2006 SEA A 161 695 110 224 9 49 .322 .370 .416 20 9 49 71 5 1 45 16 2
2007 SEA A 161 678 111 238 6 68 .351 .396 .431 22 7 49 77 3 4 37 13 7
Total 1118 4774 782 1592 67 427 .333 .379 .437 177 57 329 461 35 19 272 115 34

Fielding Stats

Year Team POS G GS INN PO A ERR DP TP PB SB CS PkO AVG
2001 SEA A RF 152 148 1313.2 335 8 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 .997
2001 SEA A DH 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2001 SEA A OF 152 148 1313.2 335 8 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 .997
2002 SEA A CF 3 3 24 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000
2002 SEA A RF 150 146 1285.1 328 8 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .991
2002 SEA A DH 4 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2002 SEA A OF 152 149 1309.1 336 8 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .991
2003 SEA A OF 159 156 1367 337 12 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 .994
2003 SEA A RF 159 156 1367 337 12 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 .994
2004 SEA A OF 158 158 1405.1 372 12 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 .992
2004 SEA A RF 158 158 1405.1 372 12 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 .992
2004 SEA A DH 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2005 SEA A OF 158 158 1388.1 381 10 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 .995
2005 SEA A RF 158 158 1388.1 381 10 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 .995
2005 SEA A DH 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2006 SEA A OF 159 158 1399.2 364 9 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 .992
2006 SEA A DH 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
2006 SEA A RF 121 120 1061.2 250 8 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 .992
2006 SEA A CF 39 38 338 114 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 .991
2007 SEA A OF 155 155 1339.1 424 8 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 .998
2007 SEA A CF 155 155 1339.1 424 8 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 .998
2007 SEA A DH 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Total OF 1093 1082 9522.2 2549 67 15 16 0 0 0 0 0 .994
Total CF 197 196 1701.1 546 9 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 .996
Total RF 898 886 7821.1 2003 58 13 13 0 0 0 0 0 .994
Total DH 22 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000

Transactions

  • Sold by Orix (Japan Pacific) to Seattle Mariners (November 30, 2000).

Trivia

  • On April 3, 2006, Ichiro and Kenji Johjima became the first pair of Japanese position players to take the field in an MLB starting lineup.


See also

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